THOUSAND DOLLAR CADDY

In 2011 I embarked on what I had no idea would be a long, dramatic, challenging, and eventful voyage. I met Noah Engh purely by chance, never having met or heard of him before, when he answered an e-blast calling for unique stories from touring musicians for a blog I wrote, at the time, for Indie on the Move. At the time he was in the midst of several years of DIY touring as a purely solo artist, creating the wildest, noisiest, and most bombastic, confrontational rock show I have ever seen. And he was doing it over three hundred days per year, completely by himself, with no management, accompaniment, or tour support. It was a ridiculous, whiskey soaked, tobacco stained, filthy era between 2010 and 2015, a portion of which was chronicled in my documentary film, My Caddy Won't Let Me (2013). The rest of it was captured through an expansive series of portraits and photo essays that I compiled into my 2015 book, Thousand Dollar Caddy. Enjoy a selection of images from the book below, then scroll down a little further to watch My Caddy Won't Let Me in its entirety.

 Thousand Dollar Caddy | Book Signing in Joshua Tree, California

Thousand Dollar Caddy | Book Signing in Joshua Tree, California

 
 

My Caddy Won't Let Me

My Caddy Won't Let Me (2013), was my fifth, and most immersive, challenging, and well received documentary film. It was hard to film, and it was hard to edit. And it was hard to explain to a lot of viewers who misinterpreted it as some sort of dark, cross-genre long form comedy film. To the delight–and horror–of many, it is very much a documentary film shot and presented exactly as it happened, with Noah Engh's ongoing commentary throughout the film encapsulating the very reality of his life and experiences, and those of other independent musicians who choose to take the road less traveled. The film was an audience favorite at private screenings and a number of film festivals, including: the Phoenix Film Festival (Phoenix, Arizona) where it was presented as an Official Selection in the Short Documentary film program; the Tucson Film and Music Festival (Tucson, Arizona); State of Film (State College, Pennsylvania); and the Elysian Project Film Festival (London, UK). The common post-viewing Q&A inquiries were always; "Is he really only twenty three?!" Yes, though he looks like he is around forty in the film; and, "Is he dead?" No, he did not die after the making of the film, and currently lives in Los Angeles with his wife and child.

 
 

Documentary Film | My Caddy Won’t Let Me


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